Global Education

Teacher resources to encourage a global
perspective across the curriculum

HIV/AIDS: Who's at risk?

Year level: 9-10

Issue: Health

Students investigate the global distribution of HIV/AIDS. They analyse its association with other factors such as income and the status of women, and discriminate between the purposes and value of different types of maps.

A rugby sports carnival in South Africa builds skills and knowledge of the importance of education and HIV prevention for reducing poverty.

A rugby sports carnival in South Africa builds skills and knowledge of the importance of education and HIV prevention for reducing poverty. Photo by Jo Elsom for AusAID


Interdependence and globalisation, Social justice and human rights

Teachers need to take care when using these materials, due to the sensitive nature of some of the content.  

Australian Curriculum links

Learning areas

Geography

Year 9

The way transportation and information and communication technologies are used to connect people to services, information and people in other places (ACHGK066)

Represent the spatial distribution of geographical phenomena by constructing special purpose maps that conform to cartographic conventions, using spatial technologies as appropriate (ACHGS066)

Year 10

The issues affecting the development of places and their impact on human wellbeing, drawing on a study from a developing country or region in Africa, South America or the Pacific Islands (ACHGK078)

Represent the spatial distribution of geographical phenomena by constructing special purpose maps that conform to cartographic conventions, using spatial technologies as appropriate (ACHGS075)  

General capabilities

  • Critical and creative thinking
  • Literacy
  • Numeracy 

Activity 1: Postcode matters

Students use prior knowledge to predict the spatial distribution of HIV/AIDS, and research current data to assess how where people live affects their chances of contracting it.

Create a map of the world using Scribble Maps or Quikmaps in groups of two or three.

Mark the map, indicating where each group thinks there are high concentrations of people with HIV/AIDS.

Discuss in groups why the concentration of HIV/AIDS may be much higher in some parts of the world than in others.

Annotate the map to reflect the discussion.

Compare the maps produced by each group as a whole class.

Explore a range of maps that are designed to show information about HIV/AIDS in the world.

Discuss in small groups:

  • What is the global distribution of people living with HIV/AIDS?
  • Which maps were the most useful in presenting the information?

Activity 2: Who is at risk?

Students explore data to analyse the association between poverty and gender and the spread of HIV/AIDS.

Read these articles about HIV/AIDS:

Discuss and complete the following sentence stems in small groups:

  • I was surprised to find out that . . .
  • The most interesting thing was . . .
  • I don’t understand . . .
  • I’d like to know more about . . .

In documenting the causes of HIV/AIDS, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) noted:

the factors contributing to the spread of the epidemic and linking it to issues such as poverty, migrant labour, income inequalities, and gender relations are crucial to an understanding of HIV/AIDS and its impact on society and the household in particular.’

Food and Agriculture Organization

Using the following sources, select three countries where there is a high prevalence of HIV/AIDS and three where there is a very low prevalence.

Collect the following data about each of these countries:

  • income per capita
  • status of women (as indicated, for example, by the percentage of girls attending secondary school)
  • access to information (as indicated by number of radios or television sets per 1,000 people)
  • numbers of intravenous drug users.

Write a paragraph responding to the question: How does the data you have collected support the argument that the spread of HIV/AIDS is linked to poverty and gender issues?

Read and discuss the following in small groups:

 

Activity 3: Drawing conclusions

Students present a summary about the complex nature of the spread and impact of HIV/AIDS and consider their response.

Choose one of the following tasks as a way of summarising your learning:

1. Write an essay in response to this statement: ‘it is clear that poverty increases vulnerability to HIV infection and poverty is compounded by HIV/AIDS’ FAO Underlying causes of HIV/AIDS.

2. Write an essay in response to this question: While HIV/AIDS is linked with poverty, not all countries with high percentages of poor people have a high prevalence of HIV/AIDS sufferers. To what extent is this related to:
a) effective preventative practices
b) use of antiretrovirals slowing the pace of AIDS
c) social attitudes and practices
d) other factors? 

3. Create a map that demonstrates what you have learnt about the prevalence of HIV/AIDS throughout the world and the pattern of its spread. Write and attach a commentary about the extent to which it is possible to present complex or multiple themes within one visual presentation. Look at the article One world, many faces. Reference various online maps as appropriate.

Reflect on your learning about the global distribution of HIV/AIDS, its association with other factors and how it can be represented on different types of maps. 

Select one of the following ways of implementing your learning:

1. Provide advice in 10 dot points about the factors a health organisation needs to take into account in running an effective public health campaign about safe sex in your school (bear in mind audience, the sensitivities of the topic, making an impact etc).

2. Devise a poster that would increase awareness of the risks of unsafe sex or HIV/AIDS prevention (bear in mind audience, the sensitivities of the topic, making an impact etc).

3. Develop your own idea for action in responding to this topic.
 

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A rugby sports carnival in South Africa builds skills and knowledge of the importance of education and HIV prevention for reducing poverty.
Photo by Jo Elsom for AusAID
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A rugby sports carnival in South Africa builds skills and knowledge of the importance of education and HIV prevention for reducing poverty. Photo by Jo Elsom for AusAID