Global Education

Teacher resources to encourage a global
perspective across the curriculum

Our many identities

Year level: F-2

Students explore their own identity through examining their arrival, multiple identities and connections to place. They develop a positive sense of self and recognise commonalities and differences with others, cultivating respect. They examine contributions people make to community and consider their own actions.

Annaprashan or First Rice, is a Hindu ceremony marking a baby’s first meal in which family members feed the baby rice.

Annaprashan or First Rice, is a Hindu ceremony marking a baby’s first meal in which family members feed the baby rice. Photo by Nauzer. This image is from Wikimedia, and is in the public domain.


Identity and cultural diversity, Social justice and human rights

Australian Curriculum links

Learning areas

Health and physical education 

Foundation

F.1 Identify personal strengths

F.4 Practise personal and social skills to interact with and include others

Years 1–2

2.1 Describe the strengths and achievements of themselves and others and identify how these contribute to personal identities

2.2 Describe physical and social changes that occur as children grow older and discuss how family and community acknowledge these

2.4 Describe ways to include others to make them feel like they belong

English

Foundation

Listen to and respond orally to texts and to the communication of others in informal and structured classroom situations (ACELY1646)

Create short texts to explore, record and report ideas and events using familiar words and beginning writing knowledge (ACELY1651)

Year 1

Discuss characters and events in a range of literary texts and share personal responses to these texts, making connections with students' own experiences (ACELT1582)

Respond to texts drawn from a range of cultures and experiences (ACELY1655)

Year 2

Create short imaginative, informative and persuasive texts using growing knowledge of text structures and language features for familiar and some less familiar audiences, selecting print and multimodal elements appropriate to the audience and purpose (ACELY1671)

General capabilities

  • Intercultural understanding
  • Literacy

Cross-curriculum priorities

  • Asia and Australia's engagement with Asia

Activity 1: Celebrating arriving in my family

Students view a range of class baby photos and share an oral and written recount of how their birth was celebrated.

Preparation  

  • Ask students to bring a baby photo and to find out a story about when they were born so that they can tell it to the class. 
  • Tell Me Again about the Night I Was Born by Jamie Lee Curtis, a story about adoption.

 

Read Tell Me Again about the Night I Was Born by Jamie Lee Curtis.

Compare this story to the story of the time that you were born.

Share your baby photo and tell the story of when you were born to the class. Include things such as:

  • How did other people find out about your birth?
  • How did your family celebrate your birth?
  • What did you or your family receive as gifts when you were born?
  • Was there a special event held to give you your name?
  • Who are the people in your family who are important to you? 
  • Do you have people outside your family who have promised to care for you as you grow up?

Using a diverse range of images of babies (such as the ones below), choose an image and discuss:

  • How am I like the people in this photo?
  • What question would I like to ask the people in the photo? 
Annaprashan or First Rice, is a Hindu ceremony marking a baby’s first meal in which family members feed the baby rice.Fathers care for their children in Pakistan as they share roles with women.A mother who is hearing-and speech-impaired learns about her legal rights and being healthy in Kawempe, Uganda.

Write a recount of your arrival in your family.

Activity 2: Multiple identities, I am ...

Students explore and compare their identities with children in other places to build respect. They build up knowledge of their multiple identities, their commonalities and differences with others in the class and other places.

Preparation

  • Internet/IWB
  • Printed images (you may like to use the ones below)

 

Women and children collect shellfish along the causeway, South Tarawa, Kiribati.

I am a worker.

A new classroom, funded by AusAID and built by Nauruan, is building long-term skills and improving education.

I am a learner.

AusAID and UNICEF have been working together to help Bhutanese children gain access to a quality education.

 I am a reader.

Group shot of young people with volunteer Pierre Johannessen in Bangladesh.

I am part of a team.

A Samoan family stands outside their traditional open-walled house.

I am a daughter, sister and part of a family.

Play equipment is provided for active learning in Pakistan.

I am a seven-year-old.

A turtle farm uses the water from the rice crop and provides extra food and income for farmers in Vietnam.

I am an animal lover.

Children are engaged in active learning in Mozambique.

I am part of a school community.

A rugby sports carnival in South Africa builds skills and knowledge of the importance of education and HIV prevention for reducing poverty.

I am a footballer.

Discuss the pictures and sentences.
Think of others that you can add.

Write a picture/photo book beginning with the sentence 'I am ...' You may like to use an online writing tool such as Storybird or Little Bird Tales.

View the introduction (2:25 minutes) of the ChildFund Connect Our Day Project (26:27 minutes).

Add some more 'I am ...' statements based on your thoughts from the children in the video.

Use the Red Thinking Hat to express your feelings after you have watched the video.

Discuss:

  • What are some things you would like to share about your day?
  • What interesting things did you notice?
  • How are the people featured in the stories and video similar to you?
  • What message do you get from watching the video?

Use the videos, photos and fact sheets on the ChildFund Connect website to find out more about the places in the video.

Complete a placemat in small groups about each country mentioned on the website (Laos, Sri Lanka, Timor-Leste, Vietnam) and record information about Australia in the centre of the placemat.

Create a one-minute video about you, your culture and your daily life to share with your class (or a wider audience), using a digital camera and software such as iMovie.

Use
ideas from the ChildFund Connect website or Kids' Vid about using video to tell a story. 

Activity 3: People and places

Students recognise similarities, differences and connections between cultures and people from different places.

Preparation

  • World Vision Australia, Photo kit – a day in the life of 5 children: Sheila from the Philippines, Misael from Honduras, Nissma from Gaza, Myagmargarig from Mongolia and Peggy from Zambia. Photos show children at school, play, home, doing chores and with their family.
  • Picture storybooks about interactions between cultures and ages, such as: You and Me: Our Place by Leonie Norrington, Am I a Colour Too? by Heidi Cole or Fair Skin Black Fella by Renee Fogorty.
     

Read You and Me: Our Place by Leonie Norrington, Am I a Colour Too? by Heidi Cole or Fair Skin Black Fella by Renee Fogorty.
Use the White Thinking Hat to discuss what you know about culture from this story.
Explain the parts of the story that have made you say this.

Discuss:

  • What message does the book give you?
  • How has the story shown this message?
  • What new perceptions have you gained about people from different cultures?
  • What could you learn from this culture?

Use the words to create a Wordle to describe identity, culture and themes that stood out from the story.

Read the story of one of the people featured in World Vision Australia's A day in the life – stories

Discuss:

  • How are the people featured similar to you?
  • How might the people featured be different from you?
  • What things might you share with them?

Complete the A day in the life information chart about the person's age, home, school, favourite activity, chores and food.

Write a letter to the person in your story, telling them about where they live, their school, favourite activity, chores at home and what they usually eat. Then tell them about your culture, your life and your home.

Extension

Activities for You and Me: Our Place by Renee Fogorty

 

Activity 4: I am a girl. I can do anything

Students investigate how assumptions can restrict our views of other people by locking them into a stereotype.

Preparation

  • Two labels: strongly agree and strongly disagree
  • IWB, internet access
  • 'I am a girl, I can play!' at ChildFund Australia
  • Clancy the Courageous Cow by Lachie Hume: a cow is excluded because he is different, but he uses that difference to his advantage, and proposes a more inclusive future 


Discuss
the picture:
The ‘Fair play for girls’ campaign in Pakistan helps promote Meena’s message of ‘A girl who plays sport remains healthy and sound’.

  • Who is featured in this photo and what are they doing?
  • Do you think this is usual? Why/why not?
  • Why might this picture have been taken?
  • What messages does the photograph communicate?

Read about how changing attitudes to educating girls is changing people's thinking and opening up possibilities for all in the case study Educating girls in Pakistan (last paragraph).

Visit 'I am a girl, I can play!' at ChildFund Australia

Discuss:

  • How do attitudes to girls and boys differ?
  • How is sport helping change attitudes to girls?

Consider your values by placing yourself on the continuum of strongly agree and strongly disagree, when statements such as the following are read:

  • Everyone should be allowed to play sport.
  • Only boys should play rough sports.
  • Girls should be protected from dangerous activities.
  • Boys should follow rules even when they don't seem fair.
  • It is all right for adults to make decisions about what children can do.
  • There should be separate play areas for boys and girls.
  • People who are different should be treated differently.
  • When there is a shortage of food, boys should get priority.
  • All women are good at caring for babies.
  • All children in Africa are starving.
  • All children from Japan are clever.

Give a reason for your choice.

Discuss: How do general statements limit our view of groups of people?

Read Clancy the Courageous Cow by Lachie Hume.

Discuss:

  • Why was Clancy treated differently?
  • How was the treatment fair or unfair?
  • How did Clancy feel about being treated differently?
  • What did Clancy do to overcome the difficulties he faced by being treated differently?

Share with a partner a time when you have felt left out and what you did about it.

Create a piece of artwork that shows how to cope with exclusion or include people who are different.

Activity 5: Contributing to community

Students examine how personal abilities and attitudes help build community. They identify their own abilities and consider how they can contribute to their community.

Preparation

  • The Little Refugee by Anh Do about escape from war-torn Vietnam


Read
 The Little Refugee by Anh Do.
Identify the main themes in the story.
List the challenges the family in the story faced and how they overcame them.
Complete a Y-chart about the story, describing what you see, hear and feel.

Discuss:

  • What helped the people in the story overcome these challenges?
  • What do you do when you find things hard?
  • What are some of the abilities and attitudes of the people in the story?
  • What are some of your abilities and attitudes?
  • What are some things the people achieved after the events in the story?
  • How have your abilities and attitudes helped you achieve changes for yourself?
  • How could you use your abilities to contribute to a wider group?

Brainstorm ways you could use your abilities to contribute to your community (eg consider new families to the area, the elderly, community gardens).

Develop a plan of action that you can carry out with your class or family that supports inclusion of different cultures, religions or sex. 

Extension

Read/view the stories of how the following young people have contributed to the community and identify their characteristics:

Contributors' notes

Francine Smith said:

26 June 2014

Some books for slightly older primary students that are very suitable for exploring our multiple identities are: Lowitja by Lowitja O'Donaghue Thura's Diary by Thura Al-Windawi My Name is Blessing by Eric Walters

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Annaprashan or First Rice, is a Hindu ceremony marking a baby’s first meal in which family members feed the baby rice.
Photo by Nauzer. This image is from Wikimedia, and is in the public domain.
Print | Save
Annaprashan or First Rice, is a Hindu ceremony marking a baby’s first meal in which family members feed the baby rice. Photo by Nauzer. This image is from Wikimedia, and is in the public domain.
Fathers care for their children in Pakistan as they share roles with women.
Photo by Heather Pillans for AusAID
Print | Save
Fathers care for their children in Pakistan as they share roles with women. Photo by Heather Pillans for AusAID
A mother who is hearing-and speech-impaired learns about her legal rights and being healthy in Kawempe, Uganda.
Photo by Kate Holt/Africa Practice
Print | Save
A mother who is hearing-and speech-impaired learns about her legal rights and being healthy in Kawempe, Uganda. Photo by Kate Holt/Africa Practice
Women and children collect shellfish along the causeway, South Tarawa, Kiribati.
Photo by Lorrie Graham for AusAID
Print | Save
Women and children collect shellfish along the causeway, South Tarawa, Kiribati. Photo by Lorrie Graham for AusAID
A new classroom, funded by AusAID and built by Nauruan, is building long-term skills and improving education.
Photo by Lorrie Graham for AusAID
Print | Save
A new classroom, funded by AusAID and built by Nauruan, is building long-term skills and improving education. Photo by Lorrie Graham for AusAID
AusAID and UNICEF have been working together to help Bhutanese children gain access to a quality education.
Photo ©UNICEF/NYHQ1996-0318/FranckCharton
Print | Save
AusAID and UNICEF have been working together to help Bhutanese children gain access to a quality education. Photo ©UNICEF/NYHQ1996-0318/FranckCharton
Volunteer Pierre Johannessen shares his skill and uses basketball to engage young people and tackle youth poverty in Bangladesh.
Photo by Pierre Johannessen for DFAT
Print | Save
Volunteer Pierre Johannessen shares his skill and uses basketball to engage young people and tackle youth poverty in Bangladesh. Photo by Pierre Johannessen for DFAT
A Samoan family stands outside their traditional open-walled house.
Photo by Plenz/Wikimedia
Print | Save
A Samoan family stands outside their traditional open-walled house. Photo by Plenz/Wikimedia
Play equipment is provided for active learning in Pakistan.
Photo ©UNICEF/HQ06-0326/Pirozzi
Print | Save
Play equipment is provided for active learning in Pakistan. Photo ©UNICEF/HQ06-0326/Pirozzi
A turtle farm uses the water from the rice crop and provides extra food and income for farmers in Vietnam.
Photo by Michael Wightman for AusAID
Print | Save
A turtle farm uses the water from the rice crop and provides extra food and income for farmers in Vietnam. Photo by Michael Wightman for AusAID
Children are engaged in active learning in Mozambique.
Photo ©UNICEFNYHQ2006-2268 / Pirozzi
Print | Save
Children are engaged in active learning in Mozambique. Photo ©UNICEFNYHQ2006-2268 / Pirozzi
A rugby sports carnival in South Africa builds skills and knowledge of the importance of education and HIV prevention for reducing poverty.
Photo by Jo Elsom for AusAID
Print | Save
A rugby sports carnival in South Africa builds skills and knowledge of the importance of education and HIV prevention for reducing poverty. Photo by Jo Elsom for AusAID
The ‘Fair play for girls’ campaign in Pakistan helps promote Meena’s message of ‘A girl who plays sport remains healthy and sound’.
Photo ©UNICEF Pakistan/2005/Zaidi
Print | Save
The ‘Fair play for girls’ campaign in Pakistan helps promote Meena’s message of ‘A girl who plays sport remains healthy and sound’. Photo ©UNICEF Pakistan/2005/Zaidi
Annaprashan or First Rice, is a Hindu ceremony marking a baby’s first meal in which family members feed the baby rice.
Photo by Nauzer. This image is from Wikimedia, and is in the public domain.
Print | Save
Annaprashan or First Rice, is a Hindu ceremony marking a baby’s first meal in which family members feed the baby rice. Photo by Nauzer. This image is from Wikimedia, and is in the public domain.